Krzysztof Wodiczko



Wodiczko is internationally renowned for his large-scale slide and video projections on architectural facades and monuments. Since the late eighties, he has developed a series of nomadic instruments for both homeless and immigrant operators that function as implements for survival, communication, empowerment, and healing.

In the last decade, Wodiczko has realized more than seventy public projections in Australia, Austria, Canada, England, Germany, Holland, Ireland, Israel, Italy, Mexico, Poland, Spain, Switzerland, and the United States. Since 1985, he has been honored with eight major retrospectives at such institutions as the Walker Art Center, Minneapolis; Museum Stuki, Lodz; Fundacio Tapies, Barcelona; Wadsworth Athenaeum, Hartford; and the La Jolla Museum of Contemporary Art, San Diego.

Wodiczko earned his MFA in 1968 from the Academy of Fine Arts in Warsaw, Poland, with an emphasis on architecture, industrial design and the visual arts. Before coming to MIT in 1991, Wodiczko was on the faculty or a visiting professor at the Ecole National Supérieure des Beaux Arts, California Institute of the Arts, Cooper Union School of Art, University of Hartford, New York Institute of Technology, Nova Scotia College of Art and Design, Ontario College of Art, Academy of Fine Arts, Warsaw, and Warsaw Polytechnic Institute. He lectures frequently around the world and has conducted seminars on such topics as the history and theory of the avant-garde; the theory and criticism of public art; nomadic design; art, identity and community; design, technology and ethics; the art of counter-memory; and interrogative design.

Essays addressing aspects of public art written by Wodiczko have appeared in October, DIA Art Foundation's Discussion on Contemporary Culture, Canadian Journal of Political and Social Theory, Assemblage, Grand Street, Theories and Documents of Contemporary Art, Art In Theory, 1945-1995, and numerous exhibitions catalogues. Volumes of his writings have been published by Ecole Nationale Supérieure des Beaux Arts in Paris and recently by MIT Press. Wodiczko's work has been exhibited in Documenta, the Paris Biennale, the Sydney Biennale, the Lyon Biennale, the Venice Biennale and other major international art festivals and exhibitions. In 1998, Wodiczko was awarded the Hiroshima Prize for his contribution as an artist to world peace. From 1995 to 1997 he was Director of the Center for Advanced Visual Studies where he now heads the Interrogative Design Group.